You've got mail: Irish history told in postage stamps

42.11 miles
0.00 out of 5
0 votes
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
February 26 2020 - March 11 2020

275 Mt. Carmel Ave.
Hamden, CT 06518
203-582-3713

PHONE: 203-582-3713

TIME: 12:00 am

Website

Info

January 23-March 11. Ireland's Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University has acquired a stamp collection that provides a visual and unique insight into almost 100 years of Irish history. Exhibit will be held in the Arnold Bernhard Library on the Mount Carmel Campus. Hours: Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. to midnight; Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, noon to midnight. Dave Clarke, who was born in Dublin, Ireland, and serves as Quinnipiac's women's soccer coach, donated his family's stamp collection.  It includes a number of rare treasures, including the first stamps created in a newly independent Ireland (then called the Free State), which date from December 1922. The collection includes many commemorative stamps, including some marking the centenary of Catholic Emancipation (issued in 1929), the bicentenary of the Royal Dublin Society (1931) and the Easter Rising in 1916 (stamps were issued to mark its 25th, 50th and 75th anniversaries).  Others represent events outside of Ireland as well. These include two stamps that were issued in 1939 to celebrate America achieving its independence, each depicting George Washington, the eagle from the Great Seal and an Irish harp.The collection also features stamps commemorating several notable Irish men, including William Rowan Hamilton, an Irish mathematician renowned for his discovery of quaternions in 1843, the tercentenary of the death of Miche√°l √" Cl√©irigh, an Irish chronicler and chief author of "The Annals of the Four Masters," and one to honor the 150th anniversary of the execution of Robert Emmet, leader of the 1803 republican rising against King George III of Great Britain. Special events in the history of the state are additionally marked, including the opening of the Shannon hydroelectric power station in 1929, the Marian Year in Ireland (1954), a year in which Catholics throughout the world remembered Mary, the mother of Jesus, and the International Year for Human Rights in 1968, which celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Reviews

+ Write a Review

Recent Reviews

Also In Historical Museums,Schools & Colleges (Exhibits Only)

0 mi
0.00 out of 5
0 votes
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
0 mi
0.00 out of 5
0 votes
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
More Events

Other Events in Quinnipiac University, Arnold Bernhard Library